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Inspirational Movies At The Parish Centre

A series of no pressure, casual movie nights. Great films with inspiring messages about God, love, family, marriage, and more.

Wednesday 23rd January

6.15 pm | Courageous (M)

When tragedy hits home, four policemen are left wrestling with their hopes, fears, faith, and fathering. Can a newfound urgency help these dads draw closer to God … and to their children?

8.30 pm | Machine Gun Preacher (R) | ADULTS ONLY

When ex-biker-gang member Sam Childers makes the life-changing decision to go to Africa to help repair homes destroyed by civil war, he is outraged by the unspeakable horrors faced by the region’s vulnerable, especially the children. An inspirational movie about a rebel who found his cause. A genuine human drama that cuts you to the core with its heartbreaking, inspiring and action-packed story. Expect some scenes of graphic violence and bad language.

Sunday 27th January

6.15 pm | End Of The Spear (M)

Nate Saint is a pilot and Christian missionary who, with his family, lives and works in the jungles of South America near the Amazon. A meeting between Nate and the local tribesmen goes terribly wrong and Nate and four of his fellow missionaries are savagely murdered. In the final moments of his life, Nate is able to impart a message that bears fruit years later when Steve Saint, Nate’s son returns to continue the work his father started. End of the Spear is adapted from the true story.

Wednesday 30th January

6.15 pm | Fireproof (PG)

When he’s battling blazes, Fire Capt. Caleb Holt adheres to the old firefighter’s adage about never leaving your partner behind; back at home, it’s an altogether different story. Caleb and his wife Catherine have been married for seven years, but lately arguments over career, housework, finances, and outside interests have driven the once-happy couple hopelessly apart.

8.30 pm | Silence (R) | ADULTS ONLY

A religious epic set in the 17th century from Oscar-winning director Martin Scorsese. It’s complex, difficult, and at times gory, but it’s also magnificent and masterful. Expect some scenes of very graphic violence (crucifixion and torture etc). The films complex message about faith and the faithful and Scorsese’s powerful imagery sticks to your ribs but the actual watching of the movie is a notably dour experience, and a test of disquieting (and often, yes, boring) cinema. A long-term passion project for Scorsese that you must be in the mood for.

Sunday 3rd February

6.15 pm | Selma (PG)

A film which chronicles the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition.

Need A Ride Out To The Parish Centre?

Call Dave on 22293 or 53040

The Second Week In Advent

Christians prepare for celebrating the birth of Jesus by remembering the longing of the Jews for a Messiah. In Advent, we’re reminded of how much we ourselves also need a Saviour, and we look forward to our Saviour’s second coming even as we prepare to celebrate his first coming at Christmas.

“Who among us will celebrate Christmas correctly? Whoever finally lays down all power, all honour, all reputation, all vanity, all arrogance, all individualism beside the manger; whoever remains lowly and lets God alone be high; whoever looks at the child in the manger and sees the glory of God precisely in his lowliness”.

― Dietrich Bonhoeffer, God Is In the Manger

“The Advent season is a season of waiting, but our whole life is an Advent season, that is, a season of waiting for the last Advent, for the time when there will be a new heaven and a new earth”. 

― Dietrich Bonhoeffer, God Is In the Manger

“When you say, ‘Doctrine doesn’t matter; what matters is that you live a good life,’ that is a doctrine. It is called the doctrine of salvation by your works rather than by grace. It assumes that you are not so bad that you need a Saviour, that you are not so weak that you can’t pull yourself together and live as you should. You are actually espousing a whole set of doctrines about the nature of God, humanity, and sin. And the message of Christmas is that they are all wrong.”

― Tim Keller, The Truth About Christmas

Thanksgiving 2018

A lot of people ask, “What is God’s will is for my life?” At out Thanksgiving Day service on Norfolk Island we read 1 Thessalonians! “Give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.”

What is God’s will for your life?

In everything give thanks!

Click here for the Chaplain’s sermon.

Praying For Norfolk Island

 

  • Sunday – That the Gospel would be boldly and unashamedly proclaimed in our churches today. That our churches would be places for the broken, unwanted and hurting. That Jesus will be offered as the only solution for the very thing we can’t do on our own –  make our selves better or save ourselves.
  • Monday – Pray that Romans 8:35-39 would become a reality. Pray for yourself, for your family, and for our church. Pray that our hope would be found in Christ alone.
  • Tuesday – Pray Matthew 6:10 over our island. Spend today replacing the word “earth” with Norfolk Island (“on Norfolk Island as it is in heaven”).
  • Wednesday – Pray that the Spirit would weed out the sin in your life that has kept you from living a life on mission. Ask that He would open up opportunities for you to be share your hope with your family and friends. Pray for them by name.
  • Thursday – Pray boldly Psalm 33:8 over Norfolk Island. The people would stand in awe before Him.
  • Friday – Pray Habakkuk 3:2 over Norfolk Island. That the Lord’s love, wrath, justice and mercy would be made known.
  • Saturday: Pray that the Lord would increase our love for Norfolk. That our love and growth in Jesus would produce a desire to see others saved, and grow in their love and understanding of who God is, what He has done and what He is doing.

New Sermon Series: Daniel

Every kingdom crumbles… except the kingdom of God.

The book of Daniel opens with King Nebuchadnezzar laying siege to Jerusalem and overpowering Israel. God’s people are defeated, humiliated, and taken away into exile. But the big message of Daniel is that how things seem is not how things are. God is still in control. God reigns over all cultures, all kingdoms, all peoples. Across all of history God has been working to set up his everlasting kingdom – the kingdom where King Jesus reigns forever. All kingdoms crumble, except the Kingdom of God.

I’m looking forward to working through the book of Daniel and learning more about the Most High God and His kingdom that lasts forever.

…for death is the destiny of everyone; the living should take this to heart.

John Steinbeck – East of Eden

“I remember clearly the deaths of three men. One was the richest man of the century, who, having clawed his way to wealth through the souls and bodies of men, spent many years trying to buy back the love he had forfeited and by that process performed great service to the world and, perhaps, had much more than balanced the evils of his rise. I was on a ship when he died. The news was posted on the bulletin board, and nearly everyone recieved the news with pleasure. Several said, “Thank God that son of a bitch is dead.”

Then there was a man, smart as Satan, who, lacking some perception of human dignity and knowing all too well every aspect of human weakness and wickedness, used his special knowledge to warp men, to buy men, to bribe and threaten and seduce until he found himself in a position of great power. He clothed his motives in the names of virtue, and I have wondered whether he ever knew that no gift will ever buy back a man’s love when you have removed his self-love. A bribed man can only hate his briber. When this man died the nation rang with praise…

There was a third man, who perhaps made many errors in performance but whose effective life was devoted to making men brave and dignified and good in a time when they were poor and frightened and when ugly forces were loose in the world to utilize their fears. This man was hated by few. When he died the people burst into tears in the streets and their minds wailed, “What can we do now?” How can we go on without him?”

In uncertainty I am certain that underneath their topmost layers of frailty men want to be good and want to be loved. Indeed, most of their vices are attempted short cuts to love. When a man comes to die, mo matter what his talents and influence and genius, if he dies unloved his life must be a failure to him and his dying a cold horror….we should remember our dying and try so to live that our death brings no pleasure to the world.”

“It is better to go to a house of mourning than to go to a house of feasting, for death is the destiny of everyone; the living should take this to heart”. Ecclesiastes 7:2

More Than Conquerors?

What does it mean in Romans 8:37 when Paul says that followers of Christ are “more than conquerors” (ESV)?

D. A. Carson gives some good answers to this question based on the context of Romans 8:

First, the “us” to whom the apostle refers includes all Christians. AllChristians are the ones whom God has foreknown, “predestined to be conformed to the likeness of his Son,” called, justified, glorified (8:29–30). The people referred to are not the elite of the elect; they are ordinary Christians, all genuine Christians.

Second, the actual evidence that they are “more than conquerors” is that they persevere regardless of all opposition. That opposition may take the form of horrible persecution, of the kind that Scripture describes (8:35–38). It may be some other hardship, all the way to famine. The glories of life will not finally seduce them; the terrors of death will not finally sway them; neither the pressures of the present nor the frustrations of the future will destroy them (8:38). Neither human powers nor anything else in all creation, not even all the powers of hell unleashed, can “separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (8:39).

Third, as the last sentence already makes clear, that from which Christians cannot be finally separated is the “love of Christ” (8:35) or the love of God in Christ (8:39). At one level, of course, that is simply saying that no power can stop Christians from being Christians. That is why we are “more than conquerors.” But that point could have been made a lot of different ways. To make it this way, with an emphasis on the love of Christ as that from which we cannot be separated, reminds us of the sheer glory and pleasure that is ours, both now and in eternity, to be in such a relationship. We are not simply acquitted; we are loved. We are loved not simply by a peer, but by God himself. Nor is this a reference to the general love that God has for his entire creation. What is at stake here is that special love that attaches to “all who have been called according to his purpose” (8:28).

Fourth, the guarantee that we shall prevail and persevere, and prove to be “more than conquerors” in this sense, is nothing other than the sovereign purposes of God (8:29–30), manifest in the death of his Son on our behalf (8:31–35). “If God is for us, who can be against us?” (8:32). No greater security is imaginable.

D. A. Carson, For the Love of God: A Daily Companion for Discovering the Riches of God’s Word., vol. 1 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 1998).

A Tale Of Two Bruces and Two Clarks

Over the next month or so we’ll enjoy the ministry of three visiting preachers.

First to visit will be Rev. Bruce Clarke of St. Matthews Manly in Sydney. Bruce will be preaching in our Big Questions series on There Can’t Be Just One True Religion Can There? 

In September, Rev. Andy Clark will be visiting. Andy is the Assistant Minister at Sylvania Anglican Church in Sydney, a church that has committed to praying regularly for David and Crystal. Andy is married to Nicole and they have three little boys. Before theological study, Andy worked as a Physiotherapist at Nepean hospital.

In October, Rev. Canon Bruce and Heather Ballantine-Jones returns as locum Chaplain while David and Crystal and family attend that Bush Church Aid bi-annual conference in Victoria. Bush Church Aid partners with Anglican Dioceses around Australia to reach people for Christ.

Big Questions

Everybody has questions. But not all questions are created equal. Some questions are really big… and they can become sticking points to faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. In this series we will boldly tackle life’s Big Questions to help believers and unbelievers alike better understand the firm foundation of Christianity.

You can catch up on the first two sermons online:

05.08.18 Big Questions: Hasn’t Science Disproved Christianity? Listen online
12.08.18 Big Questions: How Could God Allow So Many People To Suffer? Listen online
19.08.18 Big Questions: You Can’t Take The Bible Literally Can You? Available soon
26.08.18 Big Questions: There Can’t Be Just One True Religion Can There?   Available soon
02.09.18  Big Questions: How Can A Loving God Send People To Hell? Available soon